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What is an ARC FAULT


 
What is an Arc Fault? 
Also known as AFCI's
 
 VIDEOS BELOW
 
 Please use a certified electrician in your area
AFCIs should only be installed or
replaced by a licensed, qualified electrician.
 
IBEW in Houston, TX -  click here   -  Nationally click here
 
 


 

What is an Arc-Fault Circuit?  Wikipedia answer click here

 

What is a circuit breaker?  Wikipedia answer click here

 


Wiki How - click here for How to Determine when to use an ARC fault

 


Electrician Talk Forum  - Click here

 

Join ElectricianTalk.com - Click Here

 


 

InspectionNews.net

 

Arc Circuit Requirements in Texas

 

Click here


 

Practical Guide to Arc Fault

141 Pages

PDF - click here

 


 

ARC FLASH FAQ - PDF - click here

 


 

In Texas - Click here for the NEC 2008 Revisions to the CODE

 

Effective September 1, 2008, the Texas Department of Licensing and Registration will adopt the 2008 National Electrical Code (NEC) as the electrical code for the State thereby establishing the NEC 2008 as the “minimum standard” for all electrical work in Texas. The new code supersedes the 2005 edition of the NEC, which was implemented in July 2005.

Prior to September 1, 2004, Texas did not have a statewide electrical code. Cities and regional authorities were authorized to adopt and enforce local electrical codes, but many areas of rural Texas had no basic requirements.

House Bill 1487, a law passed by the 78th Texas Legislature that created the Electrical Safety Program and a state electrical license, also authorized the Texas Commission of Licensing and Regulation to adopt the NEC as the statewide electrical code, and to adopt the revised version of the code as it is updated every three years.

There are several revisions to the 2008 National Electrical Code that immediately impact the Texas homebuilder. A discussion of these revisions is noted below:

2008 NEC - 210.8 – Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter Protection

The 2008 NEC has revised this article by requiring all receptacles in garages and sheds to be GFCI protected. The exceptions of 210.8 (A)(2) in the 2005 NEC have been deleted from the 2008 code. All 125-volt single phase, 15- and 20-amp receptacles regardless of location or accessibility must now be GFCI protected.

2008 NEC 210.12 – Arc-Fault Circuit Interrupter Protection

This section of the 2008 NEC has been revised to include a list of rooms and areas where the serving branch circuits are required to be protected by arc-fault circuit-interrupter protection. The code states that AFCI protection is required for 120-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere branch circuits installed in family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms, sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, or similar rooms or areas. Areas exempt from the requirement are kitchens, bathrooms, garages, basements, and other areas or rooms not specifically identified. The AFCI-protective devises must be listed combination-types.

406.11 Tamper-Resistant Receptacles in Dwelling Units

The requirement for tamper-resistant 15- and 20-amp receptacles in dwelling units was added to the 2008 Code to increase safety for children. All areas specified in article 210.52 will now require taper-resistant receptacles.

 


You can BUY a NEC CODE BOOK online or your can call:

1 800 344 3555

 

FREE ACCESS TO THE DIGITAL CODE BOOK IS HERE

 

click here

 

The ones on the right are Arc-Fault Fuses - On a new built 2014 home

 

The Arc Fault breakers are on the right. Photo taken on a newly built 2014 home in Texas.


 

Arc Fault vs GFI - click here

 

What the TESTER looks like etc. - click here

 


 

Demonstrating an ARC FAULT - click here

 

Why it's a good idea to have an

ARC FAULT Breaker - click here

 



See what Craven's Electric Has to Say about it  click here


NEC Newsletter - Get everything you need to know here. Click here

 

The "white" buttons are the TEST buttons for the Arc Fault breakers. Photo taken on a newly built 2014 home in Texas.

 


Demo on installation of an ARC neutral fuse - click here


 

BLOG on AFCI's Work - click here

 


Consumer Safety & Recall - click here

 (800) 638-2772

 

Electrical Recalls - GFI's etc. 

 - click here

 


Definition by the NFPA

Who is the authority.

Click here

National Fire Protection Association - click here for codes

 

Facts and figures (not complete)

  • AFCI installation is required by the National Electrical Code® (NEC) in bedrooms of new residential construction (effective as of January 1, 2002). Bedrooms were selected as the first area in which to implement this requirement because of a history of fires there.
  • GFCI installation is required by the NEC for receptacles in kitchens, bathrooms, outdoor areas, basements and garages in new residential construction because of a history of shock hazards in these areas.
  • Are AFCIs expensive?
    The cost of the enhanced protection is directly related to the size of the dwelling and the number of circuits installed. Current retail prices of AFCI-type circuit breakers at several national building supply chains are in the range of $35 to $40  per unit (as of 2014). Even for larger homes with more circuits, the cost increase is insignificant compared to the total cost of the home, particularly when the increased level of safety is factored.

Source: National Fire Protection Association

 



 

 

 


Video on YOUTUBE - What is a Breaker Box ?  Click here by Hofpodcast

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMbDPyYAfXw


 

WARNING:Installing new wiring, circuits, etc. will almost always require a

wiring permit and inspection. Do not skip this important step of electrical work.

  • AFCI and GFCI are two similar looking devices with completely different purposes and are not interchangeable. An AFCI detects arcing in circuits. Pinched conductors, broken or loose connections, etc. that can contribute to the type of arcing that can result in fires, have very specific "signatures". The arcing seen in many motor operated devices (such as a drill or vacuum cleaner), or those seen when a fluorescent light starts, should not trip an AFCI device, as this type of arc does not have the signature (duration and amplitude) type that causes fires. A GFCI device on the other hand, is a precision measuring device. In most circuits, the amount of current flowing on the black wire to a device should flow back on the white wire. If there is a difference of as little as .005 (5 thousandths) amps between the hot and neutral wire, this current is "leaking" through the device case, handle, or in the case of a 3 wire cord connected appliance or tool, safety ground. Since it is likely that the user of the device is in contact with this leak current, the GFCI opens the circuit within a fraction of a second from when the leak current is first detected. This helps to prevent serious burns or injury to the user. The AFCI is designed to prevent loss of property and life due to fire, while the GFCI is designed to prevent shock or serious injury to individuals. It should evident why both types of protection are highly desirable.
  • AFCI devices (and GFCI devices for that matter) that constantly trip or trip soon after resetting indicate a defective AFCI (or GFCI) device or a potentially serious problem in the dwelling's wiring. If replacing the device does not solve to tripping issue, call an electrician as soon as possible to locate and remove the fault source. Left unresolved, fire could eventually result. Source: WIKIhow click here